How to Have Your Deck, and Keep it Beautiful Too

Perhaps you’ve had your wood deck for years. The long summer hours spent entertaining in your favorite space leaving you with fond memories of the way your deck looked in those early times. But how long has it been since you really looked at it?

The sad truth of wooden decks is that a wood deck will age.  It will take on a weathered appearance, and unless you are constantly sanding and repainting it, your deck can become a little bit of an eyesore after a couple of years. There’s nothing you can do about it.  It’s the nature of the product.

We’ve known about this for quite some time, and have worked to help homeowners protect their decks with a durable vinyl decking product that doesn’t wear out, and keeps its look into the long term.

If you’re on this site, you’re probably a little curious about how vinyl decking will benefit you. Many of our customers immediately see the practical benefits of having a professionally installed vinyl waterproofing material on their deck. Some, however, remain concerned about the way it will look on their home.

It’s true that the practical quality of our product has always been our biggest concern. Nobody wants an ugly deck, however.  Over the years, our team has worked on some absolutely beautiful decks. We have also made it easier for designers to work with vinyl by growing our selection of colors and patterns now to 28 different designs in varying sizes.

With the Durarail deck railing system, our professional installers can maintain the integrity of your deck, while accenting its beauty.  We’re really proud of the look we’ve been able to produce with Duradek and Durarail together.

If you’re considering a new deck or refinishing an old one, why not give one of our professional installers a call.  Ask them how you can protect your deck from the elements while maintaining a great look. With an international network of trained and authorized Duradek Applicators, there’s probably one in your neighborhood.

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